College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources

Horsebarn Hill at the UConn campus in Storrs
  • Gregory J. Weidemann, Ph.D., Dean
  • Cameron Faustman, Ph.D., Associate Dean
  • Patricia Jepson, Ph.D., Director, Academic Advisory Center
  • Meagan Ridder, M.A., Academic Advisor
  • Jillian Ives, M.A., Academic Advisor

In 1862, Congress passed the Morrill Land Grant Act providing grants of federal land to each state. Funds from the sale of these lands were used in establishing a college teaching agriculture and related subjects in each state. Subsequent federal acts have enlarged the responsibilities of these colleges. Today they continue to serve agriculture and society in many ways through a variety of educational programs. The University of Connecticut is the land-grant university in Connecticut. The College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources offers instruction at both undergraduate and graduate levels. Research and experimental work is carried on through the Storrs Agricultural Experiment Station. Educational and service programs are conducted throughout the State by the Cooperative Extension System. The College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources is supported by both federal and state appropriations and contributions from the private sector.

Agriculture has evolved to engage scientists concerned with food, people, and health in a manner that is economically viable and environmentally sustainable. The College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources maintains strong programs in fields such as agricultural biotechnology, allied health sciences, animal science, diagnostic and environmental sciences, health promotion, landscape architecture, medical laboratory sciences, nutritional biochemistry, pathobiology, pre-veterinary study, resource economics, and wildlife management.

The College has extensive facilities and operations to supplement and enhance instruction, learning experiences, and research. Laboratories, plants, animals, greenhouses and other related resources – both on and off campus – allow students to apply knowledge and skills in real-world, professional environments. The Agricultural Biotechnology complex, Center for Land Use Education and Research, Center for Environmental Health, Nayden Rehabilitation Clinic, Korey Stringer Institute and Athletic Training Learning Laboratory, Connecticut Institute of Water Resources, Connecticut State Climate Center, Food Marketing Policy Center, and the Wildlife Conservation Research Center are all integral components of the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources.

The following departments offer undergraduate instruction in the College: Agricultural and Resource Economics, Allied Health Sciences, Animal Science, Kinesiology, Natural Resources and the Environment, Nutritional Sciences, Pathobiology and Veterinary Science, and Plant Science and Landscape Architecture. The Directory of Courses section of this Catalog describes the course offerings of these departments. Other courses are offered under the departmental listing Agriculture and Natural Resources.

The four-year curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Science degree for all majors except Environmental Studies, which leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree.

Admission Requirements

Students may enter the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources directly upon admission to UConn as a freshman or transfer student. New students who select Allied Health Sciences will be admitted as Allied Health Sciences majors and advised by the Department of Allied Health Sciences. Professional majors in the Department of Allied Health Sciences (Dietetics, Diagnostic Genetic Sciences, and Medical Laboratory Sciences) are competitive junior/senior year programs with additional admission procedures and requirement as outlined below. Students planning to apply to the Kinesiology programs in Athletic Training, or Exercise Science should refer to specific information in the Kinesiology Programs description of this section.

See Admission to the University and New England Regional Student Program.

Scholarships

Over $550,000 in scholarships and awards are available to students in the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources.

Advisors Assigned by Major

Departmental Advisors are assigned to students upon entry into the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources according to a student’s major and area of special interest. Advisors assist students in the selection of appropriate courses and help them develop an individualized program of study that will meet educational and career goals. The office of the Associate Dean for Academic Programs and the Academic Advisory Center of the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources also support students and advisors.

Bachelor’s Degree Requirements

Maple leaf

Upon recommendation of the faculty the degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts is awarded by vote of the Board of Trustees to students who have met the following requirements: (1) earned a total of 120 degree credits; (2) earned at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average for the number of calculable credits for which they have been registered; (3) earned at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average for all courses included in the 36 credit numbered 2000 or above requirement for the major; (4) met all the requirements of the University of Connecticut, the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources, and their individual major as outlined below.

General Education Requirements

All students in the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources must meet the University-wide General Education Requirements (GER) as described in the General Education Requirements section of this Catalog.

Science and Mathematics Requirements

Students in the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources must pass at least two courses in Content Area 3, including at least one course from the list of four-credit laboratory courses; and at least two Quantitative (Q) courses, including at least one course in Mathematics or Statistics. Ordinarily, these requirements will be met by completing University general education courses and/or courses required by the Major. However, if a student receives a waiver from general education courses (e.g. based on completion of a previous baccalaureate degree) he or she must still complete the science and quantitative courses, as listed above.

36 Credit Requirement for All Majors

Students in all majors of the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources must successfully complete at least 36 credits of courses in or relating to their major. Courses for this 36 credit group may be taken from specific major requirements (as listed below for some majors), or may be selected according to a student’s individual educational and career goals. This group of courses must:

  1. be numbered 2000 or above
  2. be approved by the student’s advisor and department head
  3. include at least 30 credits taken at the University of Connecticut
  4. be taken in two or more departments
  5. include at least 15 credits from departments in the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources, which must be taken at the University of Connecticut
  6. have a combined grade point average of at least 2.0
  7. not include more than 6 credits (combined) of independent study, internship, or field studies (if included, these credits must be taken at the University of Connecticut)
  8. not be taken on Pass/Fail
  9. not include more than 6 credits of S/U coursework

Residence Requirement

It is expected that advanced course work in the major will be completed at the University of Connecticut. However, students may be eligible to use up-to six credits from other institutions in the 36-credit group if approved by their advisor and department head. These credits must be identified as courses comparable to specific University of Connecticut courses and cannot include internships, special topics, or non-specific discipline credits. Transfer students must complete at least 30 credits of 2000-level or higher course work at the University of Connecticut, including at least 15 credits in College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources courses.

Plan of Study

Students should work closely with their advisors to review requirements, recommended courses, and career goals. Each student should prepare a tentative plan of study, outlining all courses, with an academic advisor as early as possible, but in no case later than at the start of the junior year. A final plan of study, approved by the major advisor and the department head, must be filed with the Degree Auditor no later than the end of the tenth week of the semester prior to graduation. Professional majors in the Department of Allied Health Sciences do not require a plan of study.

Undergraduate Majors

Specific Course Requirements for Individual Majors

Students must complete specific courses for individual majors as outlined below. Many courses may be used to meet more than one requirement.

Students in most majors have a great deal of latitude in the choice of courses and may emphasize a range of options to meet personal objectives. Students may prepare for career opportunities in such diverse activities as research, production, distribution, business and industry, public service, health sciences, professional service, education, communications, product development, international development, environmental protection, and community resource development. In addition to formal course work students may participate in independent study projects, field internships, cooperative education, and practicums. Students may also prepare for formal education beyond the baccalaureate degree.

Advisors are available to discuss requirements, recommended courses, and career opportunities of the various majors with current and prospective students.

Double Major Option

Students may elect to complete requirements for two major fields of study offered by the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources. A student selecting this option must submit a Double Major Declaration indicating primary and secondary majors. This declaration must include a tentative plan of study and requires approval by the advisors and department heads for both respective major areas of study and the Associate Dean. The approved declaration will be submitted to the Degree Auditor. The student’s final plan of study will include a double major attachment to verify that the requirements have been met for both the primary and secondary majors. The transcript will identify both majors.

Primary Major

Students must meet all requirements as listed under the Requirements for a Major (36 credit group) and all individual major requirements as listed above.

Secondary Major

Students must meet all individual major requirements as listed above and successfully complete additional course work numbered 2000 or above not used as part of the 36 credit group for the primary major. This group of courses must:

  1. total at least 24 credits
  2. be numbered 2000 or above
  3. be approved by student’s advisor and department head
  4. be taken at the University of Connecticut
  5. include at least 15 credits of College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources courses
  6. average at least a 2.0 Grade Point Average
  7. not include more than six credits of Independent Study and Internship
  8. not be taken on Pass/Fail.
  9. not include more than 6 credits of S/U coursework

Minors

All of these are described in the Minors section of this Catalog.

Allied Health Sciences Professional Majors

The Dietetics, Diagnostic Genetic Sciences and Medical Laboratory Sciences majors are professional majors in the Department of Allied Health Sciences. For program descriptions, please refer to the program listed alphabetically under the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources. General admission and program information is described in this section.

Dietetics, Diagnostic Genetic Sciences, and Medical Laboratory Sciences are competitive junior/senior programs with additional admission requirements, certifications, and health documentation as listed below. Please contact the department for questions and further information on requirements that may vary for each program.

The admission requirements and mandatory documentation and certifications are only required of students admitted to the Department of Allied Health Sciences’ Professional majors. All other students do not need to complete this documentation unless required to do so as part of an optional internship course.

Admission

Admission for the Professional majors is competitive. The Professional majors in the Department of Allied Health Sciences are junior/senior programs. Students apply to their major(s) of choice in the spring of their sophomore year. To apply, students must have earned a minimum of 60 credits, by time of matriculation, completed all University General Education requirements, except the one W skill course within the major, and satisfied the prerequisite science courses of the major of application. Students are advised to complete all application procedures as early as possible in their fourth semester, but no later than February 1st annually. Admission is for the fall semester.

Freshman Admission

Freshmen are not admitted directly into the professional majors. Students may elect to complete admission requirements and university general education as an Allied Health Sciences major or choose another freshman admit major at the university.

Guaranteed Admission Policy

Although freshmen are not admitted directly into the professional majors, the Department of Allied Health Sciences has a Guaranteed Admission Offer. This offer provides freshmen with direct admission in the junior year to the professional major of their choice if the student fulfills the criteria described under each major below. The Guaranteed Admission Offer is made to provide students with a clear and supportive environment in which to complete admission prerequisites and achieve their academic goals in the Department of Allied Health Sciences.

In order to qualify for Guaranteed Admission to the Professional majors in Diagnostic Genetic Sciences, Dietetics, or Medical Laboratory Sciences a student must:

  1. have entered the University as a freshman;
  2. apply to the major within two years of their freshman admission;
  3. complete three successive semesters of full time study of required course work at the University of Connecticut;
  4. earn an Overall Grade Point Average of a minimum of a 3.2 for Diagnostic Genetic Sciences or must earn an Overall Grade Point Average of a minimum of a 3.0 for Dietetics, or Medical Laboratory Sciences; and
  5. meet all Admission Requirements and file a Department of Allied Health Sciences Application by the deadline.

Students meeting all of these criteria are guaranteed admission to the major.

University of Connecticut students who do not meet the Guaranteed Admission Offer will be reviewed competitively on a space available basis. Transfer Applicants to the professional majors will be reviewed on a space available basis once matriculated University of Connecticut students have been reviewed and offers of admission have been confirmed.

Transfer Admission

University transfer admission requires a minimum 2.7 GPA even though professional program admission requires a minimum 2.2 GPA. Transfer students must first be admissible to the University before an offer of admission can be extended by the Department of Allied Health Science. Transfer students may require an additional year to complete requirements depending on how their prior coursework transfers and course availability at time of registration. Students are encouraged to take prerequisites at the University of Connecticut to expedite admission to a professional program.

Supplemental Academic Standards

The Department of Allied Health Sciences requires a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.2 in order to gain admission to the professional majors. Thereafter, students must maintain the following standards of scholastic achievement to continue in the professional major. Students who fail to maintain the minimum grade point averages or minimum course standard in any of these areas are subject to dismissal from the professional program and in some cases the Department of Allied Health Sciences.

  1. Students must maintain a minimum semester grade point average of 2.2
  2. Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.2
  3. Students must maintain a minimum major grade point average of 2.2
    1. The Diagnostic Genetic Sciences Major GPA includes the following courses: AH 2001, 3121, 4241 and 4244; DGS 3222, 3223, 3225, 4224, 4234, 4235, 4236, 4246, 4248; and the Cytogenetics Concentration courses (DGS 4810, 4820, 4830, 4850 and 4997), or the Molecular Concentration courses (DGS 4501, 4502, 4503, 4850 or 4997, and one of the following: DGS 4510, 4512, 4513, 4514, or 4515).
    2. The Dietetics Major GPA includes all courses offered with the following departmental designations: AH, DIET, and the following NUSC courses: 2200, 3233, and 3234.
    3. The Medical Laboratory Sciences Major GPA includes all courses offered with the following departmental designations: AH, DGS and MLSC. Students receiving a grade less than a “C” in two or more courses with the departmental designations of AH, DGS or MLSC in any given semester are subject to dismissal from the Program and in some cases the Department of Allied Health Sciences.
  4. Students must obtain a “C” or better in all courses required for graduation that are in the Department of Allied Health Sciences. Courses vary with program.
  5. No student may take a course in the Department of Allied Health Sciences for which another course in the department is a prerequisite unless that student has earned a grade of “C” or better in that prerequisite course.
  6. No course in the Department of Allied Health Sciences may be repeated more than once (for a total of two times).

Descriptions and specific course requirements of each of the Professional Majors of Diagnostic Genetic Sciences, Dietetics, and Medical Laboratory Sciences are included in individual programs sections listed in alphabetical order within this section of the Catalog.

Additional Clinical Placement Requirements

Health

In addition to pre-entrance University requirements, students admitted to the Professional Majors in the Department of Allied Health Sciences are required to have a tetanus immunization within the past ten years; physical examination; annual tuberculin test (with chest xray for positive reactors); rubella and rubeola titers (with vaccine if titer is negative); and varicella titer. Physical examinations, tuberculin tests and chest X-rays as indicated are planned through the University Student Health Services. In addition to the basic health screening requirements students in all professional majors are required to have Hepatitis B Immunization. Students are responsible for payment of health examinations and laboratory tests not covered by their personal insurance. Students who fail to provide written documentation that they have met the above stated health requirements will not be allowed in the clinical setting.

CPR

Dietetics students are required to have Adult or Healthcare Provider cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification upon admission into the professional major. Students in the Diagnostic Genetic Sciences or Medical Laboratory Sciences majors are not required to have CPR certification. CPR certification must be kept current until graduation.

Clinical Education Certification

The Department of Allied Health Sciences will provide annual mandatory educational sessions so that students entering a professional major and who are entering the clinical setting are in compliance with both the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Standards and are knowledgeable of the requirements for compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Students who fail to provide written documentation that they have met both the above stated OSHA and HIPAA requirements will not be allowed in the clinical setting.

Clinical Experiences

Each of the professional major curricula of the department requires education experiences in clinical settings. Assignment to clinical placements is contingent upon successful completion of the appropriate prerequisite course work and the judgment of the faculty of the preparedness of the student for safe practice. Additionally, students entering clinical placements must complete clinical documentation to include but not limited to a Medicare Exclusion waiver and in some clinical settings a criminal background check. Students will be notified if they are attending a clinical facility that requires this documentation. Students are responsible for payment of criminal background checks if part of their clinical affiliation.

Fees and Expenses

Students can expect fees to approximate those of other University students. The professional majors and internship students have added expenses for texts, uniforms and/or clinical travel. Students on clinical placement or doing an internship as part of their major are responsible for all expenses associated with the clinical/internship. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the clinical agencies/internship sites. They should allow for transportation expenses which could include parking fees, cost of gasoline and cost of air travel/bus/train where necessary. Students are required to pay full fees and tuition during off-campus clinical affiliations and internships. During periods spent full-time in the affiliated areas off-campus, if applicable it is the responsibility of the students to find living quarters and to provide their own maintenance.

Insurance

It is mandatory that students in the Department of Allied Health Sciences’ Professional majors carry comprehensive health insurance, either privately or through the University. Additionally, all students in the professional majors or relevant internships are required to carry specific professional liability (malpractice) insurance under the blanket University policy. Students will automatically be billed for this on the University fee bill.

Pre-Physical Therapy, Pre-Medical, and other Health Related Pre-professional Programs

Students preparing for professional careers in physical therapy, human medicine, dentistry, physician’s assistant and other post-baccalaureate health programs may major in Allied Health Sciences, Kinesiology, Nutritional Sciences, or Pathobiology, as well as many other science-based majors throughout the University. Pre-professional programs in the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources are offered as structured options within majors, rather than as official, stand-alone majors. This allows students to consider multiple career goals without compromising their eligibility for admission into competitive professional programs. Physical Therapy at the University of Connecticut is offered at the graduate level. (Consult the Graduate Catalog for more information regarding admission requirements for the University of Connecticut ‘s Doctorate in Physical Therapy Program.)

Pre-Veterinary Medicine

Students aspiring to become veterinarians generally major in either Animal Science or Pathobiology at the University of Connecticut . Animal Science includes the study of animal genetics, physiology, nutrition, medicine, products, and behavior. Pathobiology is the study of normal and abnormal biological processes in animals, including courses in anatomy, physiology, diseases, histology, virology, and microbiology. In both majors, the structured curriculum for pre-veterinary students includes courses required for veterinary college admission. Knowledgeable advisors, professional experience, networking opportunities, and – of course – students’ success in rigorous course requirements have resulted in a great track record for UConn graduates being admitted to veterinary schools and colleges.

Honors Programs

University honors programs are available to qualified students in the College. Please refer to the section of this Catalog designated Honors Programs for further information.

Exemptions and Substitutions

Students requesting an exemption from any University and/or College requirement, or a substitution for a course or requirement, should consult their advisors. Such exemptions or substitutions must be approved by the Department Head and the Associate Dean of the College and may also require approval from the Provost’s Office.

Field Trips and Transportation Costs

Many courses require off-campus field trips. Students should budget money for participation.

Graduate Programs

Most departments provide graduate programs for students interested in greater specialization beyond the baccalaureate. The study may lead to a Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. Students planning for a graduate program should secure a comprehensive background in the basic sciences. For further information see the announcement of the Graduate School.

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