General Education Requirements

The University Senate enacted these requirements to ensure that all University of Connecticut undergraduate students become articulate and acquire intellectual breadth and versatility, critical judgment, moral sensitivity, awareness of their era and society, consciousness of the diversity of human culture and experience, and a working understanding of the processes by which they can continue to acquire and use knowledge. It is vital to the accomplishment of the University’s mission that a balance between professional and general education be established and maintained in which each is complementary to and compatible with the other.*

Every student must meet a set of core requirements to earn a baccalaureate degree, though some schools and colleges may add to the requirements listed here. To avoid delaying the progress of their degree, students should always consult the requirements listed for their particular school or college before registering. The school or college may refer the student to these Academic Regulations when the requirements and choices duplicate those listed here.

* Undergraduate students with Bachelor’s degrees from regionally accredited institutions are exempt from the University General Education Requirements but not the 2000-level and above W course within the major nor any additional general education requirements of a School/College.

Content Areas

Content Area Requirements
One 6 credits
Two 6 credits
Three 6-7 credits
Four 6 credits

The courses fulfilling the Content Areas One, Two and Three requirements must be drawn from at least six different subjects as designated by the subject letter code (e.g., ANTH or PVS). The courses within each of these Content Areas must be from two different subjects. Content Area courses may be counted toward the major.**

Normally, the six credits required as a minimum for each Content Area will be met by two three-credit courses. However, in Content Area One and Content Area Four (including Content Area Four International), repeatable one-credit courses may be included. Students may use no more than three credits of such courses to meet the requirement.

Students must pass at least seven content area courses with at least three credits each (with the exception noted above), amounting to a total of at least 21 credits.

In Content Area Three, one of the courses must be a laboratory course of four or more credits. However, this laboratory requirement is waived for students who have passed a hands-on laboratory science course in the biological and/or physical sciences.

In Content Area Four, at least three credits shall address issues of diversity and/or multiculturalism outside of the United States.

For all Content Areas, there can be multiple designations. An individual course may be approved for and may count for one Content Area, two Content Areas, or three Content Areas if one of the three is Content Area 4.

** A student will be permitted to use two courses from the same department within Content Areas One through Three if one of those courses is cross-listed in another subject letter code not otherwise used to meet this requirement.

Each Content Area window below may be opened for list display and closed as needed.

Content Area 1: Arts and Humanities

Arts and Humanities courses provide a broad vision of artistic and humanist themes. These courses enable students themselves to study and understand the artistic, cultural and historical processes of humanity. They encourage students to explore their own traditions and their places within the larger world so that they, as informed citizens, may participate more fully in the rich diversity of human languages and cultures.

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AFRA/FINA 1100 Afrocentric Perspectives in the Arts
AFRA/DRAM 3132 African American Women Playwrights, 1900 to the present
AFRA/HIST 3206 Black Experience in the Americas
AFRA/HIST/LLAS 3619 History of the Caribbean
AMST 1700 Honors Core: American Landscape
ANTH 1001W Anthropology through Film
ANTH 3401 World Religions
ANTH 3450W Anthropological Perspectives on Art
ARAB 1121 Traditional Arab Literatures, Cultures, and Civilizations
ARAB 1122 Modern Arabic Culture
ART 1000 Art Appreciation
ART/AASI/INDS 3375 Indian Art and Popular Culture
ARTH 1128 Global Perspectives on Western Art: Renaissance to Present
ARTH 1137 Introduction to Art History: Prehistoric – 14th Century
ARTH 1138 Introduction to Art History: 15th Century – Present
ARTH 1140 Introduction to Asian Art
ARTH 1141 Introduction to Latin American Art
ARTH 1162 Introduction to Architecture
AASI 3201 Introduction to Asian American Studies
AASI/HIST 3531 Japanese Americans and World War II
CHIN 1121 Traditional Chinese Culture
CHIN 1122 Modern Chinese Culture
CHIN 3250W Advanced Chinese
CHIN 3270 Chinese Film
CAMS 1101 Greek Civilization
CAMS 1102 Roman Civilization
CAMS 1103 Classical Mythology
CLCS 1002 Reading Between the Arts
CLCS 1101 Classics of World Literature I
CLCS 1102 Classics of World Literature II
CLCS 1103W Languages and Cultures
CLCS 1110 Introduction to Film Studies
CLCS 2201 Intercultural Competency towards Global Perspectives
CLCS/HEJS 2301 Jewish Humor
CLCS 3211 Indigenous Film World Wide
DMD 2010 History of Digital Culture
DRAM 1101 Introduction to the Theatre
DRAM 1110 Introduction to Film
DRAM 1501 Introduction to World Puppetry
DRAM 1811 Dance Appreciation
DRAM 2134 Honors Core: Analyzing Sports as Performance
ECON 2101/W Economic History of Europe
ECON 2102/W Economic History of the United States
ENGL 1101/W Classical and Medieval Western Literature
ENGL 1103/W Renaissance and Modern Western Literature
ENGL 1503 Introduction to Shakespeare
ENGL 1616/W Major Works of English and American Literature
ENGL 2100 British Literature I
ENGL 2101 British Literature II
ENGL 2201/W American Literature to 1880
ENGL 2203/W American Literature since 1880
ENGL 2274W Disability in American Literature and Culture
ENGL 2401 Poetry
ENGL 2405 Drama
ENGL 2407 The Short Story
ENGL 2408/W Modern Drama
ENGL 2409 The Modern Novel
ENGL 2411/W Popular Literature
ENGL 3220/HEJS 3401/W Jewish American Literature and Culture
ENGL 3320 Literature and Culture of India
ENGL 3629 Introduction to Holocaust Literature
ENGL 3633/W The Rhetoric of Political Discourse
FINA 1001/MUSI 1006 Earthtones: Vocal Ensembles
FREN 1169 Modernity in Crisis: France and the Francophone World from 1850 to Today
FREN 1171 French Cinema
FREN 1176 Literatures and Cultures of the Postcolonial Francophone World
FREN 1177 Magicians, Witches, Wizards: Parallel Beliefs and Popular Culture in France
FREN 3210 French Art and Civilization
FREN 3211 Contemporary France
FREN 3218 Francophone Studies
FREN 3224 Issues in Cultural Studies, the Media, and the Social Sciences
FREN 3230 The Middle Ages: Myths and Legends
FREN 3234 Romanticism, Realism, Fin de Siecle: 19th-Century Literature
FREN 3235 French Modernity
FREN 3261W From the Holy Grail to the Revolution: Introduction to Literature
FREN 3262W From the Romantics to the Moderns: Introduction to Literature
FREN 3267 Grammar and Culture
FREN 3268/W Grammar and Composition
FREN 3270W French Literature and Civilization in English
GEOG/URBN 1200 The City in the Western Tradition
GERM 1140W German Literature in English
GERM 1169 Contemporary Germany in Europe
GERM 1171 The German Film
GERM 1175 Human Rights and German Culture
GERM 2400 The Environment in German Culture
GERM 3251 German Culture and Civilization
GERM 3252W Studies in Early German Literature
GERM 3254W Studies in 19th Century German Literature
GERM 3255/W Studies in 20th Century German Literature
GERM 3258 Germans in Africa, Blacks in German-Speaking Countries. Colonial and Postcolonial Perspectives
GERM 3261W German Film and Culture
GERM 3264W German Cinema in Cross-Cultural Perspective
HEJS 1103 Literature and Civilization of the Jewish People
HEJS 2104 Modern Jewish Thought
HEJS/HRTS 2203 The Holocaust in Print, Theater, and Film
HEJS 3201 Selected Books of the Hebrew Bible
HEJS 3301 The Jewish Middle Ages
HIST 1100/W The Historian as Detective
HIST 1201 Modern World History
HIST 1203/WGSS 1121 Women in History
HIST 1206 Living through War in World History since 1500
HIST 1250 Sports in History
HIST 1300 Western Traditions Before 1500
HIST 1400 Modern Western Traditions
HIST 1501/W United States History to 1877
HIST 1502/W United States History Since 1877
HIST/LLAS 1570 Migrant Workers in Connecticut
HIST 1600/LLAS 1190/W Intro to Latin America and the Caribbean
HIST 1800 The Roots of Traditional Asia
HIST 1805 East Asian History Through Hanzi Characters
HIST/SCI 2206 History of Science
HIST/MAST 2210 History of the Ocean
HIST 2401/W Europe in the 19th Century
HIST 2402/W Europe in the 20th Century
HIST/LLAS 3607 Latin America in the Colonial Period
HIST/LLAS 3609 Latin America in the National Period
HIST/LLAS 3635 History of Modern Mexico
HIST/URBN 3650 History of Urban Latin America
HIST/LLAS 3660W History of Migration in Las Americas
HIST 3674/LLAS 3220 History of Latino/as in the United States
HIST 3705 The Modern Middle East from 1700 to the Present
HRTS/PHIL 2170W Bioethics and Human Rights in Cross-Cultural Perspective
HRTS 3200/W International Human Rights Law
HRTS/PHIL 3220/W Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights
HRTS 3250/W Human Rights and New Technologies
INTD 3260 The Bible
ILCS 1101 The Italian Renaissance
ILCS 1149 Cinema and Society in Contemporary Italy
ILCS 1158 Italian American Experience in Literature and Film
ILCS 1160 Culture of Fascist Italy
ILCS 1170 Introducing Italy through Its Regions
ILCS 3255W Dante’s Divine Comedy in English Translation
ILCS 3258W Cinematic Representations of Italian Americans
ILCS 3260W Italian Cinema
LAND 2210 The Common (Shared) Landscape of the USA: Rights, Responsibilities and Values
LING 1010 Language and Mind
LLAS/SPAN 1009/W Latino Literature, Culture, and Society
MAST 1200 Introduction to Maritime Culture
MUSI 1001 Music Appreciation
MUSI 1002 Sing and Shout! The History of America in Song
MUSI 1003 Popular Music and Diversity in American Society
MUSI 1004 Non-Western Music
MUSI 1005 Honors Core: Music and Nature, Music and the Environment
MUSI 1021 Introduction to Music History I
MUSI 1022 Introduction to Music History II
MUSI 1112 University Symphony Orchestra*
NRE 1235 Environmental Conservation
NURS 2175 Global Politics of Childbearing and Reproduction
PHIL 1101 Problems of Philosophy
PHIL 1102 Philosophy and Logic
PHIL 1103 Philosophical Classics
PHIL 1104 Philosophy and Social Ethics
PHIL 1105 Philosophy and Religion
PHIL 1106 Non-Western and Comparative Philosophy
PHIL 1107 Philosophy and Gender
PHIL 1175 Ethical Issues in Health Care
POLS 1002 Introduction to Political Theory
SPAN 1007 Major Works of Hispanic Literature in Translation
SPAN/LLAS 1009 Latino Literature, Culture, and Society
SPAN 1008 Christians, Muslims and Jews in Medieval Spain
SPAN 1010 Contemporary Spanish Culture and Society through Film
SPAN 1020 Fashion, Design, Art, and Identity in Spain
SPAN 3232 Literature of Crisis in Modern Spain
SPAN 3250 Film in Spain and Latin America
SPAN 3267W The Spanish-American Story
URBN 2400 City and Community in Film
WGSS 1104 Feminisms and the Arts

* MUSI 1112 has fewer than 3 credits.

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Content Area 2: Social Sciences

The social sciences examine how individuals, groups, institutions, and societies behave and influence one another and the natural environment. Courses in this group enable students to analyze and understand interactions of the numerous social factors that influence behavior at the individual, cultural, societal, national, or international level. They use the methods and theories of social science inquiry to develop critical thought about current social issues and problems.

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AFRA/ANTH 3152 Race, Ethnicity, and Nationalism
ANTH 1000/W Other People’s Worlds
ANTH 1006 Introduction to Anthropology
ANTH 1010 Global Climate Change and Human Societies
ANTH 1500 Great Discoveries in Archaeology
ANTH 2000/W Social Anthropology
ANTH 2400 Analyzing Religion
ARE 1110 Population, Food and the Environment
ARE 1150 Principles of Agricultural and Resource Economics
ARE 2235 Marine Economics and Policy
COMM 1000 The Process of Communication
ECON 1000 Essentials of Economics
ECON 1107 Honors Core: Economies, Nature, and the Environment
ECON 1108 Game Theory in the Natural and Social Sciences
ECON 1179 Economic Growth and the Environment
ECON 1200 Principles of Economics
ECON 1201 Principles of Microeconomics
ECON 1202 Principles of Macroeconomics
EDCI 2100 Power, Privilege and Public Education
ENVE 1000 Environmental Sustainability
EPSY 2810 Creativity: Debunking Myths and Enhancing Innovation
EVST 1000 Introduction to Environmental Studies
GEOG 1000 Introduction to Geography
GEOG 1700 World Regional Geography
GEOG 2000 Globalization
GEOG 2100 Economic Geography
GEOG 2320 Climate Change: Current Geographic Issues
GEOG 2400 Introduction to Sustainable Cities
HDFS 1060 Close Relationships Across the Lifespan
HDFS 1070 Individual and Family Development
HDFS 3311/W Parenthood and Parenting
HDFS 3540/W Child Welfare, Law and Social Policy
HRTS 1007 Introduction to Human Rights
LING 1020 Language and Environment
LING 1030 The Diversity of Languages
LING 2850 Introduction to Sociolinguistics of the Deaf Community
LING 3610W Language and Culture
LLAS 1000 Introduction to Latina/o Studies
MAST 1300 Maritime Communities
POLS 1202/W Introduction to Comparative Politics
POLS 1207 Introduction to Non-Western Politics
POLS 1402/W Introduction to International Relations
POLS 1602/W Introduction to American Politics
POLS 3208/W Politics of Oil
POLS 3211/W Politics of Water
POLS 3237/W Democratic Culture and Citizenship in Latin America
POLS 3615/W Electoral Realignment
PSYC 1101 General Psychology II
PSYC 1103 General Psychology II (Enhanced)
PUBH 1001 Introduction to Public Health
PP 1001 Introduction to Public Policy
SLHS 1150 Introduction to Communication Disorders
SOCI 1001/W Introduction to Sociology
SOCI 1251/W Social Problems
SOCI 1501/W Race, Class and Gender
SOCI 1701 Society in Global Perspective
SOCI 3823 The Sociology of Law: Global and Comparative
URBN 1300/W Exploring Your Community
WGSS 1105 Gender and Sexuality in Everyday Life
WGSS 1124 Gender and Globalization
WGSS 3253/W Gender Representations in U.S. Popular Culture

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Content Area 3: Science and Technology

These courses acquaint students with scientific thought, observation, experimentation, and formal hypothesis testing, and enable students to consider the impact that developments in science and technology have on the nature and quality of life. Knowledge of the basic vocabulary of science and technology is a prerequisite for informed assessments of the physical universe and of technological developments.

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AH/NUSC 1030 Interdisciplinary Approach to Obesity Prevention
ANSC/NUSC 1645 The Science of Food
BME/CSE/MCB/PNB 1401 Honors Core: Computational Molecular Biology
CHEG 1200 Intro to Food Science and Engineering
COGS 2201 Foundations of Cognitive Science
DMD 2010 History of Digital Culture
EEB 2202 Evolution and Human Diversity
GEOG/GSCI 1070 Natural Disasters and Environmental Change*
GEOG 2300 Introduction to Physical Geography
GEOG 2410 New Digital Worlds of Geographic Information Science
GSCI 1010 Dinosaurs, Extinctions, and Environmental Catastrophes
GSCI 1051 Earth’s Dynamic Environment (Lecture)*
GSCI 1055 Geoscience and the American Landscape*
LING 2010Q The Science of Linguistics
MARN 1001 The Sea Around Us
MARN 1002 Introduction to Oceanography
MATH 1050Q Mathematical Modeling in the Environment
MCB 1405 Honors Core: The Genetics Revolution in Contemporary Culture
NRE 1000 Environmental Science
NUSC 1165 Fundamentals of Nutrition
PHAR 1000 Drugs: Actions and Impact on Health and Society
PHAR 1001 Toxic Chemicals and Health
PHAR 1005 Molecules in the Media
PHYS 1020Q Introductory Astronomy
PHYS 1030Q Physics of the Environment
PLSC 1150 Agricultural Technology and Society
PSYC 1100 General Psychology I
SOIL 2120 Environmental Soil Science

* Students who complete both the laboratory course GSCI 1052 and one of the following CA 3 courses may requested that the CA 3 course be converted from a CA 3 non-laboratory to a CA 3 Laboratory course: GSCI 1051, GSCI 1055, or GEOG/GSCI 1070.

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Content Area 3: Science and Technology – Laboratory Courses

These courses acquaint students with scientific thought, observation, experimentation, and formal hypothesis testing, and enable students to consider the impact that developments in science and technology have on the nature and quality of life. Knowledge of the basic vocabulary of science and technology is a prerequisite for informed assessments of the physical universe and of technological developments.

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Content Area 4: Diversity and Multiculturalism

In this interconnected global community, individuals of any profession need to be able to understand, appreciate, and function in cultures other than their own. Diversity and multiculturalism in the university curriculum contribute to this essential aspect of education by bringing to the fore the historical truths about different cultural perspectives, especially those of groups that traditionally have been under-represented. These groups might be characterized by such features as race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identities, political systems, or religious traditions, or by persons with disabilities. By studying the ideas, history, values, and creative expressions of diverse groups, students gain appreciation for differences as well as commonalities among people.

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AFRA/FINA 1100 Afrocentric Perspectives in the Arts
AFRA/PSYC 3106 Black Psychology
AFRA/DRAM 3131/W African-American Theatre
AFRA/DRAM 3132 African American Women Playwrights, 1900 – the present
AFRA/ANTH 3152 Race, Ethnicity, Nationalism
AFRA/ENGL 3214W Black American Writers I
AFRA/ENGL 3217/W Studies in African American Literature and Culture
AFRA/HRTS/SOCI 3505 White Racism
AFRA/POLS 3642 African-American Politics
AMST 1201/ENGL 1201/HIST 1503 Introduction to American Studies
ANTH 2000/W Social Anthropology
ANTH 3150/W Migration
ANTH 3202W Illness and Curing
ANTH 3902 North American Prehistory
ANTH 3904 Ethnohistory of Native New England
ARTH 3050/W African-American Art
ARTH 3640/W Mexican and Chicano Art from Muralism to La Raza
ARTH 3645/W From Revolution to Reggae: Modern and Contemporary Caribbean Art
AASI 3201 Introduction to Asian American Studies
AASI/ENGL 3212 Asian American Literature
AASI 3221/HRTS 3571/SOCI 3221 Sociological Perspectives on Asian American Women
AASI/HIST 3531 Japanese Americans and World War II
COMM 3321/LLAS 3264/WGSS 3260 Latinas and Media
CLCS/HEJS 2301 Jewish Humor
DRAM 3130 Women in Theatre
DRAM 3133 Latina/o Theatre
EDCI 2100 Power, Privilege and Public Education
ENGL 1601W Race, Gender, and the Culture Industry
ENGL 2274W Disability in American Literature and Culture
ENGL 3210 Native American Literature
ENGL 3214 Black American Writers I
ENGL 3218/W Ethnic Literatures of the United States
ENGL 3220/HEJS 3401/W Jewish American Literature and Culture
ENGL 3605/LLAS 3232 Latina/o Literature
ENGL/WGSS 3609 Women’s Literature
ENGL/WGSS 3611 Women’s Literature 1900 to the Present
ENGL/WGSS 3613 Introduction to LGBT Literature
HEJS 1103 Literature and Civilization of the Jewish People
HEJS 3301 The Jewish Middle Ages
HIST 1203/WGSS 1121 Women in History
HIST/LLAS 1570 Migrant Workers in Connecticut
HIST 3204W Science and Social Issues In the Modern World
HIST 3570 American Indian History
HIST/LLAS 3660W History of Migration in Las Américas
HIST 3674/LLAS 3220 History of Latinos/as in the United States
HDFS 2001 Diversity Issues in Human Development and Family Studies
HDFS 3261 Men and Masculinity: A Social Psychological Perspective
INTD 2245 Introduction to Diversity Studies in American Culture
INTD 3584 Seminar in Urban Problems
ILCS 1158 Italian American Experience in Literature and Film
ILCS 3258W Cinematic Representations of Italian Americans
LLAS 1000 Introduction to Latina/o Studies
LLAS/SPAN 1009/W Latino Literature, Culture, and Society
LLAS 2011W Introduction to Latino-American Writing and Research
LLAS 3210 Contemporary Issues in Latino Studies
LLAS 3270/POLS 3662 Latino Political Behavior
LING 1030 The Diversity of Languages
LING 2850 Introduction to Sociolinguistics of the Deaf Community
MUSI 1002 Sing and Shout! The History of America in Song
MUSI 1003 Popular Music and Diversity in American Society
NURS 1175W End of Life: A Multicultural Experience
PHIL 1107 Philosophy and Gender
PSYC 2101 Introduction to Multicultural Psychology
PSYC 2701 Social Psychology of Multiculturalism
PSYC/WGSS 3102 Psychology of Women
SLHS 1150 Introduction to Communication Disorders
SOCI 1251/W Social Problems
SOCI 1501/W Race, Class and Gender
SOCI 2501/W Sociology of Intolerance and Injustice
SOCI 2503/W Prejudice and Discrimination
SOCI 3601/W Sociology of Sexualities
SOCI/WGSS 3621/W Sociology of Sexualities
URBN 1300/W Exploring Your Community
WGSS 1104 Feminisms and the Arts
WGSS 1105 Gender and Sexuality in Everyday Life
WGSS 3718/W Feminism and Science Fiction

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Content Area 4: Diversity and Multiculturalism – International

In this interconnected global community, individuals of any profession need to be able to understand, appreciate, and function in cultures other than their own. Diversity and multiculturalism in the university curriculum contribute to this essential aspect of education by bringing to the fore the historical truths about different cultural perspectives, especially those of groups that traditionally have been under-represented. These groups might be characterized by such features as race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identities, political systems, or religious traditions, or by persons with disabilities. By studying the ideas, history, values, and creative expressions of diverse groups, students gain appreciation for differences as well as commonalities among people.

Expand/Collapse Courses

AFRA/HIST 3206 Black Experience in the Americas
AFRA/HIST/LLAS 3619 History of the Caribbean
AH 2330 Italy’s Mediterranean Food and Our Health
ANTH 1000/W Other People’s Worlds
ANTH 1001W Anthropology through Film
ANTH 1006 Introduction to Anthropology
ANTH 1010 Global Climate Change and Human Societies
ANTH 1500 Great Discoveries in Archaeology
ANTH 2400 Analyzing Religion
ANTH/HRTS 3028/W Indigenous Rights and Aboriginal Australia
ANTH 3030 Peoples of the Pacific Islands
ANTH/HRTS 3153W Human Rights in Democratizing Countries
ANTH 3401 World Religions
ARAB 1121 Traditional Arab Literatures, Cultures, and Civilizations
ARAB 1122 Modern Arabic Culture
ART/AASI/INDS 3375 Indian Art and Popular Culture: Independence to the Present
ARTH 1128 Global Perspectives on Western Art: Renaissance to the Present
ARTH 1141 Introduction to Latin American Art
ARTH 3630/W Alternative Modernities: Visual Culture of Latin America
CHIN 1121 Traditional Chinese Culture
CHIN 1122 Modern Chinese Culture
CHIN 3230 Language and Identity in Greater China
CHIN 3250W Advanced Chinese
CHIN 3270 Chinese Film
CLCS 1101 Classics of World Literature I
CLCS 1102 Classics of World Literature II
CLCS 1103W Languages and Cultures
CLCS 2201 Intercultural Competency towards Global Perspectives
CLCS 3211 Indigenous Film World Wide
DRAM 1501 Introduction to World Puppetry
EEB 2202 Evolution and Human Diversity
ECON 2104/W Economic History of the Middle East
ENGL 1301 Major Works of Eastern Literature
ENGL 2301/W World Literature in English
ENGL 3120 Early and Modern Irish Literature
ENGL 3122 Contemporary Irish Literature
ENGL 3318 Literature and Culture of the Third World
ENGL 3319 Topics in Postcolonial Studies
ENGL 3320 Literature and Culture of India
ENGL 3629 Introduction to Holocaust Literature
FREN 1169 Modernity in Crisis: France and the Francophone World from 1850 to Today
FREN 1171 French Cinema
FREN 1176 Literatures and Cultures of the Postcolonial Francophone World
FREN 1177 Magicians, Witches, Wizards: Parallel Beliefs and Popular Culture in France
FREN 3211 Contemporary France
FREN 3218 Francophone Studies
FREN 3224 Issues in Cultural Studies, the Media, and the Social Sciences
GEOG 1700 World Regional Geography
GEOG 2000 Globalization
GEOG 2400 Introduction to Sustainable Cities
GERM 1169 Contemporary Germany in Europe
GERM 1171 The German Film
GERM 1175 Human Rights and German Culture
GERM 3251 German Culture and Civilization
GERM 3258 Germans in Africa, Blacks in German-Speaking Countries. Colonial and Postcolonial Perspective
GERM 3261W German Film and Culture
HEJS 2104 Modern Jewish Thought
HEJS/HRTS 2203 The Holocaust in Print, Theater, and Film
HIST 1206 Living through War in History since 1500
HIST 1600/LLAS 1190/W Intro to Latin America and the Caribbean
HIST 1800 The Roots of Traditional Asia
HIST 1805 East Asian History Through Hanzi Characters
HIST/LLAS 3607 Latin America in the Colonial Period
HIST/LLAS 3609 Latin America in the National Period
HIST/LLAS 3635 History of Modern Mexico
HIST 3705 The Modern Middle East from 1700 to the Present
HRTS 1007 Introduction to Human Rights
HRTS 3200/W International Human Rights Law
ILCS 1149 Cinema and Society in Contemporary Italy
ILCS 1160 Culture of Fascist Italy
ILCS 3260W Italian Cinema
LING 1020 Language and Environment
LING 3610W Language and Culture
MAST 2100W Ports of Passage
MAST 1300 Maritime Communities
MUSI 1004 Non-Western Music
MUSI 3421W Music in World Cultures
NRE 2600 Global Sustainable Resources
NRE 3305 African Field Ecology and Renewable Resources Management
NURS 2175 Global Politics of Childbearing and Reproduction
NUSC 1167 Food, Culture and Society
PHIL 1106 Non-Western and Comparative Philosophy
PLSC 1125 Insects, Food and Culture
POLS 1202/W Introduction to Comparative Politics
POLS 1207 Introduction to Non-Western Politics
POLS 1402/W Introduction to International Relations
POLS 3472/W South Asia in World Politics
SOCI 1701 Society in Global Perspective
SOCI 2509/W Sociology of Anti-Semitism
SOCI 3823 The Sociology of Law: Global and Comparative
SPAN 1007 Major Works of Hispanic Literature in Translation
SPAN 1008 Christians, Muslims and Jews in Medieval Spain
SPAN 1010 Contemporary Spanish Culture and Society through Film
SPAN 1020 Fashion, Design, Art and Identity in Spain
SPAN 3250 Film in Spain and Latin America
WGSS 1124 Gender and Globalization
WGSS 2105/W Gender and Science
WGSS 2255/W Sexualities, Activism and Globalization
WGSS 3255W Sexual Citizenship

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Competencies

University of Connecticut undergraduates need to demonstrate competency in four fundamental areas: information literacy, quantitative skills, second language proficiency and writing. The development of these competencies involves two parts: one establishing entry-level expectations and the second establishing graduation expectations. The entry-level expectations apply to all incoming students. The exit expectations may vary for different major fields of study.

Information Literacy Competency

Information literacy involves a general understanding of how information is created, disseminated and organized, and an ability to access, evaluate, synthesize and incorporate information into written, oral, or media presentations. Basic information literacy is taught to all freshmen as an integral part of ENGL 1010/1011, in collaboration with the staff of the University Libraries. Each major program has considered the information literacy competencies required of its graduates and built those expectations into the upper-level research and writing requirements in the major. Further details are given under the description of each major elsewhere in this catalog.

Quantitative (Q) Competency

All students must pass two Q courses, which may also satisfy Content Area requirements. One Q course must be from Mathematics or Statistics. Students should discuss with their advisor how best to satisfy these requirements based on their background, prior course preparation and career aspirations. Students whose high school algebra needs strengthening should be encouraged to complete MATH 1011Q: Introductory College Algebra and Mathematical Modeling , as preparation for other Q courses. To receive credit for MATH 1011Q, it must be taken before successful completion of another Q course. In some cases, advisors may recommend postponing registration in a Q course until after the student has completed a semester of course work at the University.

Second Language Competency

A student meets the minimum requirement if admitted to the University with three years of a single foreign language in high school, or the equivalent. When the years of study have been split between high school and earlier grades, the requirement is met if the student has successfully completed the third-year high school level course. With anything less than that, the student must pass the second semester course in the first year sequence of college level study in a single language.

Writing (W) Competency

All students must take either ENGL 1010 or 1011. Students passing ENGL 3800 are considered to have met the ENGL 1010 or 1011 requirement. Additionally, all students must take two writing-intensive (W) courses, which may also satisfy Content Area requirements. One of these must be at the 2000-level and associated with the student’s major. Approved courses for each major are listed in their sections of this catalog. (Note: ENGL 1010 or 1011 is a prerequisite to all writing-intensive courses.)