Linguistics

Jonathan Bobaljik, professor of linguistics

Linguistics Professor Jonathan Bobaljik researches the Itelmen language, spoken by only about 30 people in Kamchatka, Russia.

Course descriptions

The Department of Linguistics offers two joint majors, one together with the Department of Philosophy in Linguistics and Philosophy, and the other with the Department of Psychology in Linguistics and Psychology. For either major, a minimum of four courses (twelve credits) at the 2000-level or above from each department is required.

Linguistics and Philosophy

For the Linguistics and Philosophy joint major, required linguistics courses are LING 3110, 3410Q, and at least two additional LING courses at the 2000 level or above; and required philosophy courses are PHIL 3241 and at least three additional PHIL courses at the 2000 level or above. For this joint major, exit requirements for information literacy will be satisfied by passing LING 3110. The exit requirement for writing in the major will be satisfied by passing any W course in LING or PHIL at the 2000-level or above that has been approved by the student’s advisor for inclusion in the plan of study.

Linguistics and Psychology

For the Linguistics and Psychology joint major, specifically required linguistics courses are: LING 2010Q and 3110, and at least two out of the other 2000 level or above linguistics courses; and specifically required psychology courses are: PSYC 2100Q or 2100WQ and 3500, and at least two out of PSYC 2400, 2500, 2501, 3501, 3550W, and 3552. All students in the Linguistics/Psychology Major are strongly encouraged to take LING 5010/PSYC 5500 in their senior year. A minimum of four courses (12 credits) at the 2000 level or above from each department is required. For this joint major, exit requirements for information literacy will be satisfied by passing LING 3110. The exit requirement for writing in the major will be satisfied by passing any W course in LING or PSYC at the 2000-level or above that has been approved by the student’s advisor for inclusion in the plan of study.

A minor in Linguistics is described in the Minors section.

Other students interested in Linguistics should consider forming their major group from the courses in another field, and using courses in linguistics for their related group, as described under “Field of Concentration,” item 1.

 

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