Philosophy (PHIL)

Head of Department: Professor Donald Baxter

Department Office: Room 101, Manchester Hall

1101. Problems of Philosophy

Three credits. No student may receive more than 6 credits for PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Topics may include skepticism, proofs of God, knowledge of the external world, induction, free-will, the problem of evil, miracles, liberty and equality. CA 1.

1102. Philosophy and Logic

Three credits. No student may receive more than 6 credits for PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Techniques for evaluating inductive and deductive arguments; applications to specific arguments about philosophical topics, for example the mind-body problem or free will vs. determinism. CA 1.

1103. Philosophical Classics

Three credits. No student may receive more than 6 credits for PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Discussion of selections from such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, and Hume. CA 1.

1104. Philosophy and Social Ethics

Three credits. No student may receive more than 6 credits for PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Topics may include the nature of the good life, the relation between social morality and individual rights, and practical moral dilemmas. CA 1.

1105. Philosophy and Religion

Three credits. No student may receive more than 6 credits for PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Topics may include proofs of the existence of God, the relation of religious discourse to other types of discourse, and the nature of religious commitment. CA 1.

1106. Non-western and Comparative Philosophy

Three credits. No student may receive more than 6 credits for PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Classic non-Western texts on such problems as the nature of reality and of our knowledge of it, and the proper requirements of social ethics, along with comparison to classic Western approaches to the same problems. CA 1. CA 4-INT.

1107. Philosophy and Gender

Three credits. No student may receive more than 6 credits for PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Topics concern social ethics and gender, such as gender equality and the impact of gender norms on individual freedom. Specific topics are examined in light of the intersections between gender and race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation. CA 1. CA 4.

1165W. Philosophy and Literature

Three credits. Prerequisite: 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

Philosophical problems raised by, and illuminated in, major works of literature. CA 1.

1175. Ethical Issues in Health Care

Three credits.

Theories of ethics, with specific application to ethical issues in modern health care. CA 1.

2170W. Bioethics and Human Rights in Cross-Cultural Perspective

(Also offered as HRTS 2170W.) Three credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to sophomores or higher.

Philosophical examination of the ethical and human rights implications of recent advances in the life and biomedical sciences from multiple religious and cultural perspectives. CA 1.

2205. Aesthetics

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

The fundamentals of aesthetics, including an analysis of aesthetic experience and judgment, and a study of aesthetic types, such as the beautiful, tragic, comic and sublime. Recent systematic and experimental findings in relation to major theories of the aesthetic experience.

2208. Epistemology

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Theories of knowledge and justification. Topics may include skepticism, induction, confirmation, perception, memory, testimony, a priori knowledge.

2208W. Epistemology

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2210. Metaphysics

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Fundamental questions about the nature of things. Topics may include universals and particulars, parts and wholes, space and time, possibility and necessity, persistence and change, causation, persons, free will.

2210W. Metaphysics

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2211Q. Symbolic Logic I

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of LING 1010, POLS 1002, PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Systematic analysis of deductive validity; formal languages which mirror the logical structure of portions of English; semantic and syntactic methods of verifying relations of logical consequence for these languages.

2212. Philosophy of Science

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Issues concerning the nature and foundations of scientific knowledge, including, for example, issues about scientific objectivity and progress.

2212W. Philosophy of Science

Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2215. Ethics

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Judgments of good and evil, right and justice, the moral ‘ought’ and freedom; what do such judgments mean, is there any evidence for them, and can they be true?

2215W. Ethics

Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2217. Social and Political Philosophy

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Conceptual, ontological, and normative issues in political life and thought; political obligation; collective responsibility; justice; liberty; equality; community; the nature of rights; the nature of law; the justification of punishment; related doctrines of classic and contemporary theorists such as Plato, Rousseau, John Rawls.

2221. Ancient Philosophy

(Also offered as CAMS 3257.) Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Greek philosophy from its origin in the Pre-Socratics through its influence on early Christianity. Readings from the works of Plato and Aristotle.

2221W. Ancient Philosophy

Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

2222. Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Philosophy

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Central philosophical issues as discussed by philosophers such as Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Kant.

2222W. Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Philosophy

Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

3200. Philosophical Issues in Contemporary Life

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; open to juniors or higher. May be repeated with a change in topic for a maximum of six credits.

Philosophical dimensions of problems in contemporary life. Topics vary by semester.

3214. Symbolic Logic II

Three credits. Prerequisite: PHIL 2211.

Logical concepts developed in PHIL 2211 applied to the study of philosophical issues in the foundations of mathematics.

3216. Environmental Ethics

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; open to juniors or higher.

Inquiry into obligations to, or concerning, the environment, particularly the moral standing of animals, species, ecosystems, and natural objects.

3216W. Environmental Ethics

Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

3218. Feminist Theory

(Also offered as WGSS 3218.) Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; or WGSS 1104, 1105, or 2124.

Philosophical issues in feminist theory. Topics may include the nature of gender difference, the injustice of male domination and its relation to other forms of domination, the social and political theory of women’s equality in the home, in the workplace, and in politics.

3219. Topics in Philosophy and Human Rights

(Also offered as HRTS 3219.) Three credits. Prerequisite: One three-credit course in Philosophy or instructor consent; open to juniors or higher. With a change in content, may be repeated for credit.

What are human rights? Why are they important? Topics may include the philosophical precursors of human rights, the nature and justification of human rights, or contemporary issues bearing on human rights.

3219W. Topics in Philosophy and Human Rights

(Also offered as HRTS 3219W.) Three credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011; one three-credit course in Philosophy or instructor consent; open to juniors or higher. With a change in content, may be repeated for credit.

3220. Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights

(Also offered as HRTS 3220.) Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107. Bloomfield, Parekh

Ontology and epistemology of human rights investigated through contemporary and/or historical texts. CA 1.

3220W. Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights

(Also offered as HRTS 3220W.) Three credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011; at least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107. CA 1.

3225W. Analysis and Ordinary Language

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 2210, 2221, or 2222; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

The reaction, after Russell, against formal theories and the belief in an ideal language, and the turn to familiar common-sense “cases” and everyday language in judging philosophical claims. Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Ryle and Strawson.

3226. Philosophy of Law

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107, which may be taken concurrently.

The nature of law; law’s relation to morality; law’s relation to social facts; the obligation to obey the law; interpreting texts; spheres of law; international law; the justification of state punishment; the good of law; related doctrines of contemporary theorists such as Herbert Hart and Ronald Dworkin.

3228. American Philosophy

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; open to juniors or higher.

Doctrines advanced by recent American philosophers.

3231. Philosophy of Religion

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Various religious absolutes, their meaning and validity, existentialism and religion, the post-modern religious quest.

3241. Language: Meaning and Truth

Three credits. Prerequisite: PHIL 1102 or 2211, and at least one of PHIL 2210, 2221, or 2222.

An analysis of the concepts used in thinking about language.

3247. Philosophy of Psychology

Three credits. Prerequisite: Any one of PSYC 2500, 3500, 3550W, 3551W, or 3552; and at least one three-credit philosophy course or instructor consent.

Conceptual issues in theoretical psychology. Topics may include computational models of mind, the language of thought, connectionism, neuropsychological deficits, and relations between psychological models and the brain.

3247W. Philosophy of Psychology

Prerequisite: Any one of PSYC 2500, 3500, 3550W, 3551W, or 3552; and at least one three-credit philosophy course or instructor consent; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

3249W. Philosophy and Neuroscience

Prerequisite: At least one 2000-level or above, three-credit course in Physiology and Neurobiology (PNB), and at least one three-credit course in philosophy or consent of instructor; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

3250. Philosophy of Mind

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one 2000-level or above, three-credit philosophy course.

Contemporary issues in the philosophy of mind. Topics may include the nature of the mental; the mind-body problem, the analysis of sensory experience, the problem of intentionality, and psychological explanation.

3250W. Philosophy of Mind

Prerequisite: At least one 2000-level or above, three-credit philosophy course; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

3256. Philosophy of Perception

Three credits. Prerequisite: Any one of PSYC 2501, 3501, 3550W, or 3552; or at least one 2000-level or above, three-credit philosophy course.

Conceptual problems in contemporary models of perception. Topics may include the nature of color perception, direct perception and its alternatives, computation and representation in perception, and the connections between perception and awareness.

3256W. Philosophy of Perception

Prerequisite: Any one of PSYC 2501, 3501, 3550W, or 3552; or at least one 2000-level or above, three-credit philosophy course; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011.

3261. Medieval Philosophy

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; open to juniors or higher.

Readings from the principal philosophers between the fourth and fourteenth centuries.

3261W. Medieval Philosophy

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open to juniors or higher.

3263. Asian Philosophy

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107; open to juniors or higher.

The historical, religious, and philosophical development of Asian systems of thought.

3264. Classical Chinese Philosophy and Culture

Three credits. Prerequisite: At least one of PHIL 1101, 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, or 1107.

Classical Chinese philosophy, including such works as The Analects of Confucius and the works of Chuang Tzu, and their influence on Chinese culture.

3295. Special Topics

Credits and hours by arrangement. Prerequisites and recommended preparation vary. With a change in content, may be repeated for credit.

3298. Variable Topics

Three credits. Prerequisites and recommended preparation vary. With a change in topic, may be repeated for credit.

3299. Independent Study

Credits and hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: Open only with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic.

Advanced and individual work.

4293. Foreign Study

Credits and hours by arrangement up to a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: Consent of Department Head required, preferably prior to the student’s departure.

Special topics taken in a foreign study program.

4296W. Senior Thesis in Philosophy

Three credits. Hours by arrangement. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 or 1011 or 2011; open only with consent of instructor and Department Head; twelve credits in Philosophy at the 2000-level or above, three of which may be taken concurrently. Independent study authorization form required.

4995. Special Topics

Credits and hours by arrangement. Prerequisites and recommended preparation vary; open to juniors or higher. With a change in topic, may be repeated for credit.

4998. Variable Topics

Three credits. Prerequisites and recommended preparation vary; open to juniors or higher. With a change in topic, may be repeated for credit.

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