Mechanical Engineering

Bachelor of Science in Engineering

Course descriptions

Mechanical Engineering majors are required to complete the following:

All mechanical engineering students are required to have at least six credits of work in the mathematical sciences and sciences beyond those courses specifically required in the program. The course credits can be met at any course level. Those at the 2000 level and above can be used to meet the professional requirements
of the program. Restrictions on courses are noted in the following:

Concentrations

Concentration requirements: Nine credits (three courses, 2000 level and above); no course grades of less than C; plan of study for concentration; must take courses from subset of identified courses.

Aerospace Concentration

Three courses from: ME 3239, 3251, 3275, 32763280, 5311, 6160*, or ME 3295 (Special Topics) taught as any of the following: Acoustics, Aerospace Control Systems, Analysis of Composite Materials and Structures, Computer Aided Engineering, or Structural Dynamics.

Energy and Power Concentration

Three courses from: ME 3239, 3270, 32723275, 3280, 3285, 5311, 6160*.

* These courses are offered as combined Undergraduate/Graduate classes. Students may opt to take the graduate course or take it as ME 3295 Special Topics.

Dynamic Systems and Control Concentration

Three courses from: ME 3214, 5160, 5180, 5210, 5420, 5895 (Special Topics, when taught as Mechatronics), 6330, or 3295 (Special Topics) when taught as any of the following: Aerospace Control Systems, Acoustics, Advanced Vibrations, Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, Linear Automatic Control Systems, Mechatronics, or Structural Dynamics, ME 5160, 5180, 5210, 5420, 6330, or 5895 Special Topics when taught as Mechatronics.

Design and Manufacturing Concentration

Three courses from: ME 3217, 32183221, 3222, 3224, 3225, 3228, 5511, 5155, 5150, 5210, 5220, or 3295 (Special Topics) when taught as any of the following: Analytical and Applied Kinematics, Computer Aided Engineering, Geometric Modeling, Intelligent Material Systems and Structures, Manufacturing Robotics, Principles of Machining and Machine Tools, or Principles of Optimum Design.

Concentration in Naval Science and Technology

The concentration in Naval Science and Technology is designed to expose students to engineering concepts and topics of importance to the Navy and industries that support naval science and technology. It is focused on facilitating interactions between students and naval professionals as well as hands-on and experiential activities related to senior design projects or independent study projects that have naval science and technology connections.

To complete this concentration, students must complete nine credits of Naval Science and Technology Coursework topics, distributed as follows:

  1. At least three credits of ENGR 3109.
  2. Six credits from the following courses: ME 3279, 3299, 4972, 4973W.

Students electing to complete the concentration must do so in their primary major, and as such select elective coursework from their primary discipline. Students electing to use their Senior Design course sequence must have their project topic approved by both their departmental senior design coordinator and either the director of the Navy STEM Program or the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education.

Students electing to use Special Topics courses or Independent Study/Research courses must have the course or research topic approved by both their department and either the director of the Navy STEM Program or the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education. Other courses relevant to naval science and technology may be considered for the concentration by petition to the director of the Navy STEM Program or the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education. Students may not apply courses used in this concentration to fulfill requirements for other concentrations or minors.

The concentration in Naval Science and Technology is restricted to U.S. citizens.

Details on the ME and Professional Requirements are specified in the Guide for Mechanical Engineering Majors.

The faculty of the Mechanical Engineering program at the University of Connecticut strives to continuously improve our undergraduate program in Mechanical Engineering. The program’s educational objectives are that our graduates:will be gainfully employed in Mechanical Engineering or related career paths including industrial, academic, governmental and non-governmental organizations and will continue their professional development by engaging in professional activities and/or training to enhance their careers and/or pursue post-graduate studies.

The Mechanical Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

Mechanical Engineering Department

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